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FUTSAL COACHING:

BACK PASS AND THE RULE OF 4 SECONDS IN FUTSAL

 

Very often (especially among amateur futsal players) a question is raised about the procedure of passing the ball back to a goalkeeper – is it allowed?  If yes, then in what situations? What are the restrictions etc. Even those who think they know what the rules say about it, do not often know all the details. As a result, arguments, misunderstandings, stupid mistakes and awkward situations occur.

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Because the keeper has such an important role in futsal (not only in defending the goal, but also in initiating attacking plays), it is absolutely vital to be 100% sure of what the keeper is & is not allowed to do.

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There are also a lot of questions about the ''4-second rule''.

So I decided to end all the confusion and address common misunderstandings in this one article. I provide below concise information relating to a keeper in attacking plays, taken from FIFA's Futsal Laws of the Game 2012-2013:

 

An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a goalkeeper commits any of the following four offences:

1. Controls the ball with his hands or feet in his own half of the pitch for more than four seconds

2. After playing the ball, he touches it again in his own half of the pitch after it has been deliberately played to him by a team-mate without an opponent playing or touching it

3. Touches the ball with his hands inside his own penalty area after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate

4. Touches the ball with his hands inside his own penalty area after he has received it directly from a kick-in by a team-mate

In all these cases, the referee publicly makes a 4-second count if:

1. After playing the ball, a goalkeeper touches it again in his own half of the pitch after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate without an opponent playing or touching it (the goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball by touching it with any part of his body, except if the ball accidentally rebounds off him);

2. A goalkeeper touches the ball with his hands inside his own penalty area after it has been kicked to him by a team-mate;

3. A goalkeeper touches the ball with his hands inside his own penalty area after he has received it directly from a kick-in by a team-mate.

Remember - it is not necessary for the goalkeeper to have the ball in his hands before the referees begin the 4-second count.

 

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